Saturday, 14 May 2016

A Daytime Emergence at Last

With the weekend here and a bit of time hopefully for photography, I checked the pond this morning to see if I could see any dragonfly nymphs that might emerge during the day. So far I have photographed a few species at night but really wanted the chance to capture a dragonfly species emerging during the day. As I scanned the pond, I soon found a Broad bodied Chaser nymph with its head and body out of the water and was sure that it would emerge soon. I checked throughout the morning and after having lunch as I looked out of the window, I could see some movement with the nymph starting to climb up a reed. I prepared the area and got the camera and all important drinks and snacks ready and thankfully after the nymph had settled, I was able to remove the pot from the pond and put on the grass which in turn gave me a non cluttered background. I spent the next two hours watching and photographing the whole emergence mainly using AV mode, f8, ISO 400 and the speed was normally above 350. The only time I needed the flash and to use manual mode was at the beginning when it was a little cloudy but thankfully, there was some good sunny spells which helped me capture some very pleasing shots of the emergence. I don't think I can ever tire of this spectacle and just watch in astonishment as the dragonfly emerges from the small nymph. A fantastic afternoon doing one of the things I love doing best, photographing natural wonders and hoping to strive for photographic excellence of these beautiful insects.













Broad bodied Chaser (female)

10 comments:

  1. Beauuuuuuuutifuuuuuuul, the best I've seen. Absolutely stunning.

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  2. Amazing, amazing. Does it happen in one smooth, slow-motion action or are there quicker movements with pauses in between?

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    1. Thanks Wilma. It takes a while for the nymph to settle but after emerging and hanging upside down, it pauses for about 20 mins while its legs harden. Then it all pops out and the wings start to form. A good 2 hours I would say for the process.

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  3. Utterly stunning pictures! A fine-looking, the dragon leaves the hatch in the middle of the body.

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    1. Many thanks Anne for your kind words.

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  4. Excellent photography, Marc, which totally shows the amazing process. Stunning!!

    Best wishes - - - Richard

    P.S. Have given you an honourable mention in my latest blog post

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    1. Many thanks Richard. Good to see your interest in dragonflies growing. I look forward to seeing your photos.

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  5. I somehow missed this post, so, catching up. Words kinda fail me. I didn't think it was possible but you've captured even more detail and clarity, Marc. The shots as the adult just begins to break through the old skin are incredible. The whole series is breathtaking.

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