Monday, 14 December 2015

Best of the Dragonflies and Damselflies 2015 (Part 2)

As mentioned in the last post, I have had many highlights during 2015 and have been lucky on most occasions to be able to get a number of images of the various species I have encountered. I am lucky to have a site for Red veined Darter close to home and a look during summer and early autumn revealed some newly emerged individuals with provided me with a few photo opportunities before they hopefully flew south to migrate.

'Dewy' Red veined Darter

Red veined Darter (teneral)

Red veined Darter (male)

The Willow Emerald Damselfly continues to do well in Kent and appears to be slowly spreading in eastern England but I wonder how many have been photographed in the wild emerging? I spent a few sessions at a site where I was able to witness this still nationally rare damselfly emerging from the water and managed to capture the damselfly with the exuviae.

'Newly Emerged' Willow Emerald Damselfly

After my success last year of finding a single female Scarce Emerald Damselfly at a site near Reculver, c40 miles from the known site in Kent, I was really pleased to find a few males this year and spent some time trying to capture a decent image which eventually I think I managed whilst another early morning session provided another pleasing 'dewy' shot of a Common Blue Damselfly. I just love being out early in these conditions looking for these early morning sun opportunity shots.

Scarce Emerald Damselfly (male) 

Common Blue Damselfly at Sunrise

Although common, one of my best shots this year was of a male Banded Demoiselle which I photographed at Westbere Lakes on a cloudy day. Knowing they wouldn't be flying, I found a resting male and using in camera flash, ended up with a nice clean image.

Banded Demoiselle (male)

Add to this, Norfolk Hawkers, my best Four spotted Chaser shot this year and a posing Black Darter at Thursley Common and I think I can happily say that I have had a good year with the camera on the odonata front and hope that I can continue to build on this in 2016.

Four spotted Chaser 

Black Darter (male) 

Norfolk Hawker (male)

'Dewy' Common Darter

Although not the last post of the year, I would just like to thank all the people that have taken the time to look at my photos and make a comment, whether a one off comment or a regular reader, they are all very much appreciated. Its this kind of support that encourages me to go out time and time again to enjoy photographing dragonflies and damselflies and trying to bring the very best images to show you on the site. Thank you all very much!

24 comments:

  1. Oh yes :-) some very special and memorable shots here Marc. Love it :-)

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    1. Thanks Warren. Very pleased with how they have mostly worked out this year. Back to the drawing board now to think of some new challenges for next year.

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  2. Oh man, you are incredible, lovely creatures Marc.

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    1. Many thanks Bob. The more you watch them, you realise they are indeed super insects.

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  3. Gorgeous images Marc. Great shots of some great creatures.

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    1. Many thanks Bob. Something to look over during the colder months.

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  4. Some very good pictures here as always...............

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  5. Each shot is a winner. I love how the scarce emerald male is so delicate and yet so fierce.

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    1. Many thanks Wilma. They are little gems aren't they. I just hope they can hold on at this site as they could go either way.

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  6. A stunning set of images Marc...your dedication and enthusiasm has certainly paid off.
    Looking forward to seeing next years images...[;o)

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  7. Many thanks for your kind words. Iv'e certainly had a good few sessions looking back on them now.

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  8. A fantastic selection of "the best of the best", Marc. The newly emerged Willow Emerald with exuviae is really special, considering its scarcity. I also love the lines/aesthetics and incredible detail you've captured on the Scarce Emerald male. You got the depth of field spot on to depict from the tips of the cerci to the base of its feet - just brilliant.

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    1. Many thanks Lucy for your detailed fine words. I hope I can continue to inspire a few people next year to photograph these lovely insects.

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  9. Hi Mark I have followed your blog for a while now but this is a first time I have left a comment. This type of odonata photography is what I would love to do. Your images of dragon, damselflies are simply stunning, and I look forward to seeing more next year.

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    1. Many thanks for the comment, much appreciated. Its taken me a while but after many many hours of practice, i'm now producing some quite pleasing images.

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  10. Hello Marc, a most wonderful series of your best photos of this year. Wishing you Happy holidays and a fantastic 2016 with again wonderful photographs to look forward too.
    Regards,
    Roos

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    1. Many thanks Roos for taking the time throughout the year to look at the site and leave some comments. Have a good Christmas and hopefully it will be a good 2016 for the camera.

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  11. Many brilliant captures in what for us in the North East was a poor year for Odonata. I visit my son in Kent a few times a year and hooked up with Warren for a fab day at Westbere seeing my first Scarce Chaser a site you put me onto through your blog. I missed the Norfolk Hawkers in Kent by a few days sadly but seeing glorious images of them and many others almost made up for it. Looking forward to see what you can come up with next year Marc. All the best in the new year.
    John

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    1. Many thanks John for your kind words.

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  12. That selection of images is, in my eyes, unbeatable, Marc. It scores on all counts - technical, rarity value, and artistic interpretation. Utterly fantastic!!! I'm really looking forward to your winter activities with the larvae, and to seeing what you get up to when summer returns.

    Have a great Christmas, and my very best wishes to you for 2016 - - Richard

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    1. Many thanks Richard. Have a Merry Christmas and hope all works out well next year.

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