Saturday, 6 October 2018

Southern Migrant Hawker Exuviae Study (Part 2)

With the grim cloudy weather and rain today not being condusive for any dragonfly hunting, I decided to spent a few hours at home photographing a few more Southern Migrant Hawker exuviae. This time however, I wanted to try to photograph them in a more natural setting to show what they would look like if found in the wild. For this, I inserted a few exuviae on to some reeds to show them off and then was able to set up the tripod and spend some time taking a few pleasing efforts with the camera.
 

Southern Migrant Hawker (Aeshna affinis) - female exuviae
 
As I have mentioned a number of times, I get just as much pleasure photographing the exuviae as I do watching and photographing the adults. Thankfully the exuviae can't move but can be tricky to get all in focus with the macro depending how close you are working. I always like to spend a moment when I have found an exuviae to think of the story which has unfolded in the reeds or emergent vegetation. Having spent in the Southern Migrant Hawkers case, probably one year developing from an egg to adult in this country, it always amazes me of the secret transformation that literally unfolds, and to leave such an amazing delicate work of art behind in the form of the exuviae allows us to understand a little more about their secretive lives.
 

Southern Migrant Hawker (Aeshna affinis) - female exuviae
 
Having spent a few evenings last week getting familiar with some of the identification features on the Southern Migrant Hawker exuviae compared to the Migrant Hawker exuviae, I have tried where possible to capture some of these features in the photos which will hopefully help aid myself and others as to the presence of this species. With their excellent season this year, it would be nice to think that observers will be a little more wise to the features of this species should they find an exuviae.
 


Southern Migrant Hawker (Aeshna affinis) - male exuviae


9 comments:

  1. As always, brilliant shots Marc.

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    1. Many thanks Bob. Much appreciated. Plenty more 'new' exuviae to come over the next few months to keep my interest up.

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  2. Hi Marc, Have you ever thought of writing a book. I knew virtually nothing about dragonflies until I started reading your blog.

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    1. You're not the first to have asked this. I would love to do this but know next to nothing about how to go about it.

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  3. Terrific job with the lighting. Beautiful details.

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    1. Many thanks Wilma. They certainly are little jewels of nature.

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  4. Sorry to take so long in getting round to look at this post, Marc. A wonderful post, and full of useful information. The annotated images will be very useful for future reference. Thank you! Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Many thanks Richard. Just finished an exuviae comparison with the Migrant Hawker. All being well if they are useable, I will post soon.

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